HIPAA Compliance-Privacy Office

Posted by Sheri Harris on Sunday, November 14, 2010
IN THE UNITED STATES


Memorandum in Support of Patient Privacy


Scope

To protect patients from the accidental release of health information by verbal transmission.

Problem

Medical offices and buildings are not designed for privacy. This is either due to thin walls and protective measures that are not made within to create an atmosphere of confidentiality between the waiting room, reception area and the physicians office.

Should medical offices be required to have confidential walls and plexiglass doors that separates the exam rooms from the rest of the medical office which would include the reception area and waiting room?

Patients are entitled to privacy and confidential discussion. Offices are very busy and small in so that they are unable to accomodate conversations or discussions in cramped space along with workers and other patients who are in the same area.  The conversations of patients often extend from the exam room to the reception area and to the waiting room. This at times is very difficult to avoid. When parameters are set such as plexiglass walls and doors the physician is able to communicate with his or her physician privately as the medical staff can process medical information without other patients in the office becoming privy to conversations and problems.

Healthcare workers are surrounded by information due to the confined areas of workspace. This includes corridors and walkways which allows conversations to be heard, how can this be reduced?

The job description of a healthcare worker does involve the handling of sensitive and private information on a daily basis. However, due to the work assigned they may also be around when a physician is speaking with a patient. If compliance were made with regards to the use of plexiglass walls and doors as a requirement within the healthcare workers area, this would eliminate the verbal release of information between a physician and patient thus, providing privacy when needed the most.

Conclusion

Privacy walls and doors should become part of HIPAA compliance regulations. This would require that all medical offices be built in this manner and older offices be adjusted to comply with this regulation.


 Dated:  November 14, 2010                          Attest:  A. Sadiq                      
                                                                              On Behalf of Pieces





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HIPAA Compliance-Privacy Office

Posted by Sheri Harris on Sunday, November 14, 2010
IN THE UNITED STATES


Memorandum in Support of Patient Privacy


Scope

To protect patients from the accidental release of health information by verbal transmission.

Problem

Medical offices and buildings are not designed for privacy. This is either due to thin walls and protective measures that are not made within to create an atmosphere of confidentiality between the waiting room, reception area and the physicians office.

Should medical offices be required to have confidential walls and plexiglass doors that separates the exam rooms from the rest of the medical office which would include the reception area and waiting room?

Patients are entitled to privacy and confidential discussion. Offices are very busy and small in so that they are unable to accomodate conversations or discussions in cramped space along with workers and other patients who are in the same area.  The conversations of patients often extend from the exam room to the reception area and to the waiting room. This at times is very difficult to avoid. When parameters are set such as plexiglass walls and doors the physician is able to communicate with his or her physician privately as the medical staff can process medical information without other patients in the office becoming privy to conversations and problems.

Healthcare workers are surrounded by information due to the confined areas of workspace. This includes corridors and walkways which allows conversations to be heard, how can this be reduced?

The job description of a healthcare worker does involve the handling of sensitive and private information on a daily basis. However, due to the work assigned they may also be around when a physician is speaking with a patient. If compliance were made with regards to the use of plexiglass walls and doors as a requirement within the healthcare workers area, this would eliminate the verbal release of information between a physician and patient thus, providing privacy when needed the most.

Conclusion

Privacy walls and doors should become part of HIPAA compliance regulations. This would require that all medical offices be built in this manner and older offices be adjusted to comply with this regulation.


 Dated:  November 14, 2010                          Attest:  A. Sadiq                      
                                                                              On Behalf of Pieces





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HIPAA Compliance-Privacy Office

Posted by Sheri Harris on Sunday, November 14, 2010
IN THE UNITED STATES


Memorandum in Support of Patient Privacy


Scope

To protect patients from the accidental release of health information by verbal transmission.

Problem

Medical offices and buildings are not designed for privacy. This is either due to thin walls and protective measures that are not made within to create an atmosphere of confidentiality between the waiting room, reception area and the physicians office.

Should medical offices be required to have confidential walls and plexiglass doors that separates the exam rooms from the rest of the medical office which would include the reception area and waiting room?

Patients are entitled to privacy and confidential discussion. Offices are very busy and small in so that they are unable to accomodate conversations or discussions in cramped space along with workers and other patients who are in the same area.  The conversations of patients often extend from the exam room to the reception area and to the waiting room. This at times is very difficult to avoid. When parameters are set such as plexiglass walls and doors the physician is able to communicate with his or her physician privately as the medical staff can process medical information without other patients in the office becoming privy to conversations and problems.

Healthcare workers are surrounded by information due to the confined areas of workspace. This includes corridors and walkways which allows conversations to be heard, how can this be reduced?

The job description of a healthcare worker does involve the handling of sensitive and private information on a daily basis. However, due to the work assigned they may also be around when a physician is speaking with a patient. If compliance were made with regards to the use of plexiglass walls and doors as a requirement within the healthcare workers area, this would eliminate the verbal release of information between a physician and patient thus, providing privacy when needed the most.

Conclusion

Privacy walls and doors should become part of HIPAA compliance regulations. This would require that all medical offices be built in this manner and older offices be adjusted to comply with this regulation.


 Dated:  November 14, 2010                          Attest:  A. Sadiq                      
                                                                              On Behalf of Pieces





null

HIPAA Compliance-Privacy Office

Posted by Sheri Harris on Sunday, November 14, 2010
IN THE UNITED STATES


Memorandum in Support of Patient Privacy


Scope

To protect patients from the accidental release of health information by verbal transmission.

Problem

Medical offices and buildings are not designed for privacy. This is either due to thin walls and protective measures that are not made within to create an atmosphere of confidentiality between the waiting room, reception area and the physicians office.

Should medical offices be required to have confidential walls and plexiglass doors that separates the exam rooms from the rest of the medical office which would include the reception area and waiting room?

Patients are entitled to privacy and confidential discussion. Offices are very busy and small in so that they are unable to accomodate conversations or discussions in cramped space along with workers and other patients who are in the same area.  The conversations of patients often extend from the exam room to the reception area and to the waiting room. This at times is very difficult to avoid. When parameters are set such as plexiglass walls and doors the physician is able to communicate with his or her physician privately as the medical staff can process medical information without other patients in the office becoming privy to conversations and problems.

Healthcare workers are surrounded by information due to the confined areas of workspace. This includes corridors and walkways which allows conversations to be heard, how can this be reduced?

The job description of a healthcare worker does involve the handling of sensitive and private information on a daily basis. However, due to the work assigned they may also be around when a physician is speaking with a patient. If compliance were made with regards to the use of plexiglass walls and doors as a requirement within the healthcare workers area, this would eliminate the verbal release of information between a physician and patient thus, providing privacy when needed the most.

Conclusion

Privacy walls and doors should become part of HIPAA compliance regulations. This would require that all medical offices be built in this manner and older offices be adjusted to comply with this regulation.


 Dated:  November 14, 2010                          Attest:  A. Sadiq                      
                                                                              On Behalf of Pieces





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