Medicine for Foreign Travel

Posted by Sheri Harris on Friday, May 22, 2009 Under: TRAVEL

Obtaining vaccines necessary to foreign travel can become as complicated as getting a passport. People who travel out of the country every now and then go from primary care doctors to infectious disease specialists for vaccinations needed.   Medicine has not become understandable to the point to have such doctors provide these types of vaccines in readily available form to the public. It could be considered a waste of time and money especially in a town where many can barely afford to get to and from work let alone vacation outside of the United States.  Meaning, that now you have only a handful of physicians that do administer vaccines and when you make an appointment, one may be difficult to quickly get and once you arrive the office is very crowded almost like an emergency room or a health center at a hospital.  Even more of a problem you not only have to vaccinate yourself, your children when traveling with you have to also receive vaccines. How should medicine eliminate such haste and prevent waste?

IDEA: 

Along with a script from your primary care physician, pharmacies should provide gel coated patches for vaccines like Hepatitis A and B, Yellow Fever and even preventative vaccine patches for diseases like Malaria.  These patches would contain the same medication  given in vaccines for Hepatitis and Yellow Fever, you would simply have an adult dose and one for children.  A patch  consisting of Picaridin can be worn for Malaria.  If you're worried about the onset of Swine Flu, Tamiflu/Relenza Patches can be worn to protect the body in advance of influenza.

Why the use of patches?

Because patches can be worn as the medication beings to absorb itself into the skin and throughout the body.  When taking medications there may be a senstivity that may require you to eat something while you take them.

Vaccines have to be administered at least three times within 6 months and may be only good for three years, Yellow Fever vaccine may be good up until ten. There are different preventative remedies for Malaria, which can be complicated.  Once a prescription is obtained from your doctor one can go to the pharmacy to receive the medicated patches. They can be worn at least a few days before travel, and you just wear the patch 2-3 hours and remove once done. For Hepatitis you just wear a new patch, twice within six months of the first one-this makes it a total of three.  As this should immunize one for a few years. No more lengthy doctors visits, accompanied by where to obtain the actual vaccine if not in stock at the physician's office you and your children use- the patch will do it all.


In : TRAVEL 



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About Me


The writer professes a desire for human existence to evolve itself. If in effect change cannot withstand such struggles of forefather implementation; then it will be that of America who will exist without furthur progress. Sadiq's General e-mail: gdi104@aol.com

Medicine for Foreign Travel

Posted by Sheri Harris on Friday, May 22, 2009 Under: TRAVEL

Obtaining vaccines necessary to foreign travel can become as complicated as getting a passport. People who travel out of the country every now and then go from primary care doctors to infectious disease specialists for vaccinations needed.   Medicine has not become understandable to the point to have such doctors provide these types of vaccines in readily available form to the public. It could be considered a waste of time and money especially in a town where many can barely afford to get to and from work let alone vacation outside of the United States.  Meaning, that now you have only a handful of physicians that do administer vaccines and when you make an appointment, one may be difficult to quickly get and once you arrive the office is very crowded almost like an emergency room or a health center at a hospital.  Even more of a problem you not only have to vaccinate yourself, your children when traveling with you have to also receive vaccines. How should medicine eliminate such haste and prevent waste?

IDEA: 

Along with a script from your primary care physician, pharmacies should provide gel coated patches for vaccines like Hepatitis A and B, Yellow Fever and even preventative vaccine patches for diseases like Malaria.  These patches would contain the same medication  given in vaccines for Hepatitis and Yellow Fever, you would simply have an adult dose and one for children.  A patch  consisting of Picaridin can be worn for Malaria.  If you're worried about the onset of Swine Flu, Tamiflu/Relenza Patches can be worn to protect the body in advance of influenza.

Why the use of patches?

Because patches can be worn as the medication beings to absorb itself into the skin and throughout the body.  When taking medications there may be a senstivity that may require you to eat something while you take them.

Vaccines have to be administered at least three times within 6 months and may be only good for three years, Yellow Fever vaccine may be good up until ten. There are different preventative remedies for Malaria, which can be complicated.  Once a prescription is obtained from your doctor one can go to the pharmacy to receive the medicated patches. They can be worn at least a few days before travel, and you just wear the patch 2-3 hours and remove once done. For Hepatitis you just wear a new patch, twice within six months of the first one-this makes it a total of three.  As this should immunize one for a few years. No more lengthy doctors visits, accompanied by where to obtain the actual vaccine if not in stock at the physician's office you and your children use- the patch will do it all.


In : TRAVEL 



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Medicine for Foreign Travel

Posted by Sheri Harris on Friday, May 22, 2009 Under: TRAVEL

Obtaining vaccines necessary to foreign travel can become as complicated as getting a passport. People who travel out of the country every now and then go from primary care doctors to infectious disease specialists for vaccinations needed.   Medicine has not become understandable to the point to have such doctors provide these types of vaccines in readily available form to the public. It could be considered a waste of time and money especially in a town where many can barely afford to get to and from work let alone vacation outside of the United States.  Meaning, that now you have only a handful of physicians that do administer vaccines and when you make an appointment, one may be difficult to quickly get and once you arrive the office is very crowded almost like an emergency room or a health center at a hospital.  Even more of a problem you not only have to vaccinate yourself, your children when traveling with you have to also receive vaccines. How should medicine eliminate such haste and prevent waste?

IDEA: 

Along with a script from your primary care physician, pharmacies should provide gel coated patches for vaccines like Hepatitis A and B, Yellow Fever and even preventative vaccine patches for diseases like Malaria.  These patches would contain the same medication  given in vaccines for Hepatitis and Yellow Fever, you would simply have an adult dose and one for children.  A patch  consisting of Picaridin can be worn for Malaria.  If you're worried about the onset of Swine Flu, Tamiflu/Relenza Patches can be worn to protect the body in advance of influenza.

Why the use of patches?

Because patches can be worn as the medication beings to absorb itself into the skin and throughout the body.  When taking medications there may be a senstivity that may require you to eat something while you take them.

Vaccines have to be administered at least three times within 6 months and may be only good for three years, Yellow Fever vaccine may be good up until ten. There are different preventative remedies for Malaria, which can be complicated.  Once a prescription is obtained from your doctor one can go to the pharmacy to receive the medicated patches. They can be worn at least a few days before travel, and you just wear the patch 2-3 hours and remove once done. For Hepatitis you just wear a new patch, twice within six months of the first one-this makes it a total of three.  As this should immunize one for a few years. No more lengthy doctors visits, accompanied by where to obtain the actual vaccine if not in stock at the physician's office you and your children use- the patch will do it all.


In : TRAVEL 



null

Medicine for Foreign Travel

Posted by Sheri Harris on Friday, May 22, 2009 Under: TRAVEL

Obtaining vaccines necessary to foreign travel can become as complicated as getting a passport. People who travel out of the country every now and then go from primary care doctors to infectious disease specialists for vaccinations needed.   Medicine has not become understandable to the point to have such doctors provide these types of vaccines in readily available form to the public. It could be considered a waste of time and money especially in a town where many can barely afford to get to and from work let alone vacation outside of the United States.  Meaning, that now you have only a handful of physicians that do administer vaccines and when you make an appointment, one may be difficult to quickly get and once you arrive the office is very crowded almost like an emergency room or a health center at a hospital.  Even more of a problem you not only have to vaccinate yourself, your children when traveling with you have to also receive vaccines. How should medicine eliminate such haste and prevent waste?

IDEA: 

Along with a script from your primary care physician, pharmacies should provide gel coated patches for vaccines like Hepatitis A and B, Yellow Fever and even preventative vaccine patches for diseases like Malaria.  These patches would contain the same medication  given in vaccines for Hepatitis and Yellow Fever, you would simply have an adult dose and one for children.  A patch  consisting of Picaridin can be worn for Malaria.  If you're worried about the onset of Swine Flu, Tamiflu/Relenza Patches can be worn to protect the body in advance of influenza.

Why the use of patches?

Because patches can be worn as the medication beings to absorb itself into the skin and throughout the body.  When taking medications there may be a senstivity that may require you to eat something while you take them.

Vaccines have to be administered at least three times within 6 months and may be only good for three years, Yellow Fever vaccine may be good up until ten. There are different preventative remedies for Malaria, which can be complicated.  Once a prescription is obtained from your doctor one can go to the pharmacy to receive the medicated patches. They can be worn at least a few days before travel, and you just wear the patch 2-3 hours and remove once done. For Hepatitis you just wear a new patch, twice within six months of the first one-this makes it a total of three.  As this should immunize one for a few years. No more lengthy doctors visits, accompanied by where to obtain the actual vaccine if not in stock at the physician's office you and your children use- the patch will do it all.


In : TRAVEL 



null

Medicine for Foreign Travel

Posted by Sheri Harris on Friday, May 22, 2009 Under: TRAVEL

Obtaining vaccines necessary to foreign travel can become as complicated as getting a passport. People who travel out of the country every now and then go from primary care doctors to infectious disease specialists for vaccinations needed.   Medicine has not become understandable to the point to have such doctors provide these types of vaccines in readily available form to the public. It could be considered a waste of time and money especially in a town where many can barely afford to get to and from work let alone vacation outside of the United States.  Meaning, that now you have only a handful of physicians that do administer vaccines and when you make an appointment, one may be difficult to quickly get and once you arrive the office is very crowded almost like an emergency room or a health center at a hospital.  Even more of a problem you not only have to vaccinate yourself, your children when traveling with you have to also receive vaccines. How should medicine eliminate such haste and prevent waste?

IDEA: 

Along with a script from your primary care physician, pharmacies should provide gel coated patches for vaccines like Hepatitis A and B, Yellow Fever and even preventative vaccine patches for diseases like Malaria.  These patches would contain the same medication  given in vaccines for Hepatitis and Yellow Fever, you would simply have an adult dose and one for children.  A patch  consisting of Picaridin can be worn for Malaria.  If you're worried about the onset of Swine Flu, Tamiflu/Relenza Patches can be worn to protect the body in advance of influenza.

Why the use of patches?

Because patches can be worn as the medication beings to absorb itself into the skin and throughout the body.  When taking medications there may be a senstivity that may require you to eat something while you take them.

Vaccines have to be administered at least three times within 6 months and may be only good for three years, Yellow Fever vaccine may be good up until ten. There are different preventative remedies for Malaria, which can be complicated.  Once a prescription is obtained from your doctor one can go to the pharmacy to receive the medicated patches. They can be worn at least a few days before travel, and you just wear the patch 2-3 hours and remove once done. For Hepatitis you just wear a new patch, twice within six months of the first one-this makes it a total of three.  As this should immunize one for a few years. No more lengthy doctors visits, accompanied by where to obtain the actual vaccine if not in stock at the physician's office you and your children use- the patch will do it all.


In : TRAVEL 



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